NOT SO WELL KNOWN MAINTENANCE TIPS TO KEEP YOUR MACHINE RUNNING

In order to keep your car running its best, it is important to keep up with routine maintenance and inspections. Well, like cars, your machines are the same way. By properly maintaining your machine, you’ll reduce future repair costs, optimize your machine’s performance, and extend the life of the machine.

Here are some ‘NOT So Well Known Maintenance Tips to Keep Your Machine Running in Tip, Top Shape’:

1. DO YOURSELF AND YOUR MACHINE A FAVOR… SPEND SOME MONEY ON AN ECONOMICAL MEGGER

The next time you think you need a drive unit, check the motor first with this less than $100 tool. This easy to use plugin tool can tell you if the motor is bad or not. If the motor is bad, you just prevented the damage of the second drive.

Which Megger Should I Buy?

Pick up the 500volt megger with a 1000 mohm capacity (or our suggested entry level Supco M500 Insulation Tester). If your motor and/or power cables are below 100 megaohms from leg to ground while disconnected from the drive, you will need to fix the insulation issue before any drive is swapped or ordered. Contact Hartwig’s Service Support Team to help you troubleshoot along the way.

 

2. DO YOU HAVE A MILL MACHINE WITH MORE THAN 10,000 RPM’S ON THE SPINDLE?

  • If so, chances are the machine is lubricated by air over oil for long maintenance-free lubrication. There is an air filter on the back of the machine that should be changed out every two years. Waiting too long to do so, ensures the air is not being filtered properly and particles could enter your spindle bearings.

  • While replacing your filter, be sure to top off the spindle air oil reservoir with an approved DTE oil light ONLY.
    *Note: Do not let the operator fill this with way oil as there is a tendency to have more bills repairing than you want. Hartwig’s annual PM’s can replace this for you and keep things worry-free.*

3. IS THE SHOWER COOLANT NOT AS STRONG AS IT USED TO BE?

Most vertical mills have a cover to gain access to a check valve. (Pictured Below) This valve has a tendency to collect micro-sized chips over the years. A few minutes of work can get your coolant and tool life back to factory specs.

4. EXPERIENCING AN EC OVERLOAD ALARM?

There is more you can do than just turning up the overload! The electrical print below shows us the proper motor setting (auxiliary motor section – usually in front) that should be used. And as always, for a better understanding or questions in general about the motor settings, please feel free to contact Hartwig’s Service Support Team, we are always happy to assist.

Most of the time overloads are caused by jammed up chip conveyors, clogged up coolant motors, or coolant motors with low levels. For conveyors, you can manually grab the chip ball using a back and forth motion to help free up the belt.

5. EXPERIENCING A 758 ALARM?

Common Causes:

  • Chuck proximity switches are rubbing the actuator plate leaving the switches to become loose causing a short circuit
  • Foot switches may get kicked around, stepped on, or embedded with chips to narrow this down to a small batch of possibilities.

How Can You Prevent This?

  • Make sure your operators are keeping the switches tight
  • The operators can set the gap by using a folded post-it note or a straight business card
  • Monthly inspections and some tender loving care can prevent unwanted downtime
  • Hartwig’s Service Support Team can assist in the breakdown of code associated with the alarm, narrowing down the root of the problem

6. WHEN DO I CHANGE MY OIL(S) AND FILTER(S)?

The Operation & Maintenance Manual that comes with your machine gives you detailed instructions on what and when to perform this routine maintenance, but for a quick easy way to remember see the picture below. Almost every Okuma machine has an oil charge that lets you know when to inspect, replenish, and change your machines oils and filters. These quick guides often show switch and solenoid locations as well.

Written By: Kurt Lamoreau – Service Manager at Hartwig, Inc.